First impressions of the Kindle 3G

I caved in and bought a 3G Kindle despite proclaiming just two short years ago that I preferred physical books:

“I guess despite being a full on tech guy, books are one area in which I like the tangible item. I spend much of the day online reading and working with screens; books are a welcome respite from pixels. I realize digital formats are more sensible, devices have made great strides in readability, and probably are much more ‘green’; perhaps I’ll look back on this post in a decade and laugh at my naivety.”

While I was at it I picked up two more Kindles for my mom. Being a voracious reader, I’m hoping it’ll get plenty of use.

Kindle lighted Cover First impressions of the Kindle 3GI realized that with my nomadic lifestyle, it no longer suited me to utilize 20% of my luggage for books. I could sit here and nitpick with all the changes (touchscreen, much better speed, color while retaining non-glare qualities, etc) the Kindle could use, but all in all I love it.

An interesting observation – every single one of my family members that first picks up the Kindle tries to use it as a touch screen like the iPad, swiping for page changes.

The other great thing about the Kindle 3G is that I get internet for free nearly anywhere in the world. Since we travel quite often, and at times to rather remote islands and locations in S.E. Asia, this could be an easy and free way to stay connected.

 

 

 

 

In America for the summer

We’re in America for the summer after wrapping up a frantically paced spring in Manila. There’s nothing like the Tennessee lake and sun to absorb stress and decompress from our metropolitan lifestyle. I’ve been enjoying a bit of a digital diet considering the extent to which I’m connected while in Asia. That means very little internet, minimal Facebook, Twitter or email. I hardly watch any TV when in Manila, and have kept that also to a minimum.

We’ll be relaxing here for a while, and then will head to Indian Rocks Beach, Florida for a couple of weeks in July.

On a completely separate note, here’s a photo I took on the island of Negros, southern Philippines. Surreal sky:

20101016 IMG 4562 540x359 In America for the summer

Post about Indonesian women and expat men has reached 221 comments

This post from nearly 5 years ago has certainly received a lot of feedback – currently at 221 comments. And there were many more comments not approved or moderated for various reasons (and I’m very lenient). It appears the nature of relationships between Asian women and foreigners is a hot topic. Unfortunately, the discussion also seems to breed hate, blatant racism, extreme generalizations, and the other crap that comes with the telling of peoples’ personal history.

Each of these delicately composed comments comes streaming (and sometimes shouting) into my inbox, at times more frequently than bathroom breaks. I’m so often tempted to respond, to speak my own mind, and share my experiences having been with an amazing, loving, and caring Indonesian woman for so many years – experiences so very opposite from the majority of those sharp words expressed in the comments. But then again, whose mind am I going to change? If someone has had a horrible experience with love or has witnessed a partner using them only as a means to an end, who am I to say that they’re wrong to lash out?

Despite the fact that this blog is centered around photography, travel, culture, and my own life experiences as an expatriate living in Asia, I’ll continue to allow the comments to flow. I simply ask that before you contribute to the discussion, you ask yourself if you’d say the same thing if you were face-to-face with others, that you consider the flip side to your beliefs and statements, and that you strive to maintain some semblance of respect – especially in terms of religion. Don’t confuse the disparity of wealth and blatant naivety with a particular religion.

Having said that, perhaps it’s time for me to share my own perspectives on this matter from many years of personal experience.

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