Has micro-blogging destroyed your blog?

I’d like to pose a question: “Has the advent of Twitter, FB status updates, (micro-blogging) changed the way you blog?”.

With this now, Now, NOW culture, have the days of carefully composed blog posts died? Have you abandoned your blog in favor of the dialogue and communication options available with Twitter and other tools? Has your blog been killed off, like a Mom-n-Pop bookstore wilting in the shadow of Amazon?

Or have you perhaps slowed your approach to blogging, taking more time to compose less frequent but higher quality posts, in which maybe there has been a positive change?

Thoughts?

  • hungry_traveler

    Indeed. If you see my blog, metromotoristnyc.blogspot.com, I started earnestly with issue oriented articles which, I find out quickly, to be pedantic and just plain dull. Later, like all blogs, I allowed it to run fallow until I began to implement posterous, tumblr as well as fb/twitter to feed content. Now Google reader allows immediate posting to all platforms, regardless of origin and originality of thought.

    In the interwebs, Joseph Schumpeter's model of creative destruction allows for parsing even smaller ideas faster and wider. Look at Evan Williams, one of the originators of Blogger go to work on twitter because he realized “bigger is NOT better” but twitter is mostly viral. I mean, I do enjoy your blog posts but I enjoy your tweets better 'cause is the conglomeration of thought and content at different intervals that makes interesting, especially when links are involved. Links back to your blog.

    • javajive

      Thank you for your insightful comment. Interesting that you prefer my tweets over my blog. Too bad I hold back a bit from both considering fellow coworkers follow on both sites. 😉

  • dean

    i haven't posted to my blog since around august i guess. part of the problem was my webhost/domain name reseller didnt follow through on my renewal of my domain name, and when i finally tried to take care of it myself, it had already expired and they wanted an extra hundred bucks to renew. when the dust settled, a month or more had gone by, i ended up with a .net to replace my .com, and all my readers were gone. duly discouraged, i let writer's block set in, my former blogging time is now monopolized by FB & twitter, and i'm not exactly sure what i'll do from here blog-wise.

    OMG, how depressing…

    • javajive

      I know it's easy to stop once you've taken a pause. I do that with working out; if I'm out of the gym for a month, those quickly turn into more months if I'm not disciplined (like in the summer when I'm traveling)

      Sorry to give you a bout of depression.

  • Pillowfight

    Yes, they killed my blog. See my comment on Facebook–HA!

    Culturally, I think the move to shorter and shorter posts is probably bad. But you can't close Pandora's box…it's here, and Facebook and Twitter are not going away.

    Still not willing to delete the site or give up my domain, though. I guess I have a shred of hope somewhere that someday I might be able to resurrect it from the dead.

    • javajive

      Ironic that you commented first on Facebook and I responded to you a full 12 hours earlier there than here…. hmmm….

      “Facebook and Twitter are not going away” …. let's quote you on that in, say, 5 years? Keen to know what their future will be and what is the next big thing after them both. Then again, Flickr is still alive and kicking after 5+ years.

  • No, micro-blogging REVIVED my blog. Twitter helped me build a readership (albeit relatively small).More importantly, I could figure out what to write about.

    I am blogging much more than I ever have, and will hit 1,000 posts before the end of this month — over 800 of those this year alone. There's also much greater variety in content. I am posting pictures, comments on websites, quotes from news articles, youtube videos… a lot of sound-bites, along with the longer more considered posts.

    • javajive

      I find it intriguing, Brett, that you've upped your posting, but also could that correlate with the fact that you were new (unless I'm incorrect about you being new) to blogging, and naturally would have increased your tempo with or without FB / FF / Twitter?

      800 posts a year is a lot! Good work man.

      I agree, if utilized properly, Twitter can be a gold-mine for new ideas, conversations, links, etc.

  • I've been quoted as saying that Twitter is blogging for people with ADHD.

    Bad Twitter feeds are full of the minutiae of people's lives… good Twitter feeds are like little blogposts. But while 140 characters is wonderful for pithy aphorisms, it is no substitute for the rich language of a well-written blog post.

    I will post maybe two to five tweets a week… and twice as many “real” blogposts. But I have seen other bloggers go off the deep end, neglecting their blogs but spewing forth hundreds of tweets. Feh.

    In the ideal world, there's a scenario in which the quick, viral nature of Twitter, the “selected audience” character and interactivity of Facebook, and the “throw it on the wall and see what sticks” quality of blogging reach a dynamic equilibrium, complementing and enhancing each other. We'll see.

  • I've been quoted as saying that Twitter is blogging for people with ADHD.

    Bad Twitter feeds are full of the minutiae of people's lives… good Twitter feeds are like little blogposts. But while 140 characters is wonderful for pithy aphorisms, it is no substitute for the rich language of a well-written blog post.

    I will post maybe two to five tweets a week… and twice as many “real” blogposts. But I have seen other bloggers go off the deep end, neglecting their blogs but spewing forth hundreds of tweets. Feh.

    In the ideal world, there's a scenario in which the quick, viral nature of Twitter, the “selected audience” character and interactivity of Facebook, and the “throw it on the wall and see what sticks” quality of blogging reach a dynamic equilibrium, complementing and enhancing each other. We'll see.